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What a Foundation in Christ Means

What a Foundation in Christ Means

By Senior Pastor Gary Lewis

“For we know that if the earthly tent we live in is destroyed, we have a building from God, an eternal house in heaven, not built by human hands.” 2 Corinthians 5:1


The Apostle Paul was a skilled master builder.


In his first letter to the Corinthians, he said he “laid a foundation” in the city of Corinth, and then someone else began to build on it. (1 Corinthians 3:10) Paul believed “each one should build with care,” whether they use gold, silver, precious stones, wood, hay or straw. But in any good construction project the foundation is Jesus Christ. (vv. 10-12)


All across the country, and even in Elkhart, a new approach to stopping homelessness has emerged. Tiny homes are being built on a Christian foundation to address a growing need. These homes – 250 to 400 square feet in size – give people who live in them dignity. These tiny homes are rented at first and then residents can qualify to own them. Shelter is one of our most important needs. Another top need is sleep, which is best experienced in the protection of shelter.


Paul advances his construction theme in the second letter to the Corinthians, and he continues to build with care on the foundation of Jesus Christ. He draws our attention to what God is raising up in us. “We know that the one who raised the Lord Jesus from the dead will also raise us with Jesus and present us with you to himself.” (2 Corinthians 4:14)


Paul is not focusing on the raising of walls to give us shelter in this life. Instead, he is pointing us toward the resurrection, which will raise us into everlasting life. “Therefore we do not lose heart. Though outwardly we are wasting away, yet inwardly we are being renewed day by day. For our light and momentary troubles are achieving for us an eternal glory that far outweighs them all. So we fix our eyes not on what is seen, but on what is unseen, since what is seen is temporary, but what is unseen is eternal.” (2 Corinthians 4:16-18)


Paul realizes that our “outer nature” is going to waste away, whether it is our physical body, or the physical home that provides shelter for our bodies. Whether we live in a mansion made of stone or a tiny home constructed of wood, it will not last forever.


“For we know that if the earthly tent we live in is destroyed, we have a building from God, an eternal house in heaven, not built by human hands.” (2 Corinthians 5:1) At the end of our life, our body and our home are nothing more than an “earthly tent.” No matter how well it is built, it will be destroyed. At that point, we move into a building from God … eternal in the heavens.


We need to realize that everything in this world will eventually pass away, so we should live by faith and focus on the building from God that is eternal in the heavens. This means trusting Jesus instead of the leaders of the world. It involves working for the common good, instead of pursuing only personal success. It includes valuing what cannot be seen – honesty, integrity, sacrifice, love – instead of the things of this world that can be seen. What cannot be seen is eternal. “So we fix our eyes not on what is seen, but on what is unseen, since what is seen is temporary, but what is unseen is eternal.” (2 Corinthians 4:18)


At the end of life, we will all go home, and it won’t be to a tiny home or a spacious mansion. Instead, it will be a house not made with hands. So get ready for it.


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